28 February 2009

Pinarello City Bike

I saw it in Washington as I was passing by the window:

Pinarello city bike townie
What a gorgeous bike! And a Pinarello? Has anyone ever heard of a Pinarello Townie? I have provided lots of photos, does anyone know anything about this bike?

Pinarello city bike townie

Pinarello city bike townie

Pinarello city bike townie leather skirt guard

Pinarello city bike townie headbadge

Pinarello city bike townie fender flange

Pinarello city bike townie handlebars

Pinarello city bike

22 comments:

jhaygood said...

Where WAS that bike? It doesn't look locked (or is it locked with one of those built-in, city bike locks?) I can't imagine leaving a bike that nice out all on it's lonesome.

Really nice though!

Thom said...

[Drooling...a lot.]

Freewheel said...

Beautiful... this was left unlocked with no sign of the owner?

melancholic optimist said...

I've never heard of them before specifically, but it's a beautiful bike. Looks like the company still exists, but now makes only super sporty type bikes which aren't nearly as beautiful as this one. Nice find!

Charlotte said...

It was displayed in the window of a high-end design store in Georgetown. It was a birthday gift to the owner by one of his suppliers. He has never ridden it.

Melencholy Optimist, the company is quite old, my husband has a red Pinarello Treviso from the early 80s. What's odd to me is that this city bike looks brand new, but there's no sign that they're making more. It is very unlikely that it's super old, and if so I would think there would be at least one more out there on the internet. This bike is such a mystery!
The last thing that makes me suspicious is the mis-alignment of the "Pinarello" decal on the chainguard. I would think that if Pinarello really made this bike they would get that lined up.

So pretty, such a mystery...

Karl McCracken (twitter: @karlonsea) said...

That leather coat guard is superb! I now know what I'm going to use when mine eventually wears out.

Dottie said...

That is gorgeous! I've never heard of it before in all my research about such bikes.

Brian said...

Charlotte,
The gears look like they're automatic, or electric. That makes me think it's new. Quite a beautiful bike. Almost looks to good to ride - especially in Georgetown. I live in DC...the potholes, cobblestones and the risk of being 'doored' are enough to age a bike like that very quickly!

Capateto said...

Looks like this Pinarello has rod brakes, which suggests that either it's very old and an excellent refurbishing job or it's a newly constructed throwback.

Charlotte said...

Capeteto,
This thing is pristine, it's definitely brand new.

The rod brake levers even say "Pinarello" on them.

Capateto said...

Can't seem to find any info on this Pinarello city bike on the Web. Frustrating! But wow, is it beautiful!!!

Anonymous said...

Modern lights, modern cranks, modern saddle... And I don't think Pinarello has ever built a bike that's not race oriented. Or a single speed that don't belongs to the track.
It definitely looks like a fake, on a Azor or Flying Pidgeon steel frame.

Audeamus said...

I think I have a Pinarello catalog from the mid-90s at home with bikes like this. They're all beautiful city bikes w/ characteristically Italianesque styling, sort of an Italian Pashley or Velorbis. They're not Civetas in detail, but wonderful, plush, Sunday in the park kind of rides. Just beautiful, isn't it? Love the pinstriping...

The Stouts said...

That is a truly gorgeous bike!

Anon of Florida said...

From the looks of it it is actually brand new, most likely bought in Italy and brought here as 'luggage'.

These are likely throwback designs, as quite a few Italian manufacturers make these. To name a few; Abici, Taurus, even Bianchi currently make models like these.

Some even have rod brakes with aluminum rims!

Here is a website that sells a number of these traditional style bicycles: http://www.lordgunbicycles.com/shop/city-bikes-c-46_48.html

From observation from various models, there are characteristics that distinguish Italian rod braked bicycles from those of other countries.

One is that the pivots of the rod brake linkages are attached to the frame by brazed on mounts that hold the pivots somewhat off the bike. In comparison, rod brakes from other countries (India, China, England, Netherlands) have the pivots fixed to the frame via bosses on the frame tubes themselves.

And second is that the rear rod brake is positioned off the seatstays. In contrast, the rear rim rod brakes from other countries are positioned off the chainstays.

The only North American distributer I know of that imports these bicycles is 4th Floor Distribution (www.onthefourth.com/)which are based in Toronto Canada.

Chelsea said...

I heart this bike!! I have a new crush!

Charlotte said...

Anon of Florida,
I think you're on to something here. Thank you!
One of those bikes has the same chainguard, fenders, design, handlebars, even skirt guard - in different colors and not branded Pinarello, but still...

THANK YOU for your link! It's really nice to 1) find out where (in a global sense) this bike is coming from and 2) see the 'practical' bikes of Italy. What beauties!

danae said...

I found this skirt guard! Sadly it's at a German website but here it is: http://www.classic-cycle.de/index.php?sid=9edd56a99ed83ba00ebe1074c3c1c8d5&

Anonymous said...

It is a Flying Pigeon that some phony put Pinarello decals on. The bike sells for $200-$300 and it's not even worth that! As a REAL Pinarello owner I'm embarrassed by that junk.

Anonymous said...

Ya they still make them. We live in Treviso IT and the Pinarello store carries tons of them. Old man giovanni still sweeps out the store. He is from Treviso.. just a bit north of Venice. They run about 500 euros.

MetalLau said...

Pinarello is a great bike. I live near by the company where they are made. I've got an old Pinarello road bike.. Just love it!
Cheeeerrrrzz
Laura

Anonymous said...

This is a very nice bike... Please understand that Pinarello makes nothing these days, outside contractors make their various models. While most (all?) of the high end models are from Asia, this style bike is still popular in Italy and may very well be made in Italy. Most Italian bike lines offer similar models in the domestic market. Note it is a single speed, no gears.